Call for Presenters: CATS Spring Workshop

The CATS 2019 Spring Workshop will be held on May 10th at the Durango Public Library. We are looking for presenters to speak on teen and tween topics!

If you have an amazing program, resource, or idea that you want to share, fill out the form below. This is a free workshop and there will be no monetary or travel compensation.

Click this link to access the presentation submission page. The deadline to submit your proposal is April 15th.

If you have any questions, please contact Maria Kramer
at maria.kramer@pueblolibrary.org or Cameron Riesenberger at criesenberger@ppld.org

CATS 2019 Winter Workshop Reflection: SarahEllen Hickle

My journey to the 2019 CATS Winter Workshop was significantly shorter than most – in fact, it basically involved heading in to work as usual.  I am fortunate enough to work at Pikes Peak Library District’s Library 21C as the Family Place Librarian.  Library 21C is a Family Place Library – one of three in the district connected to other libraries nationwide through the Family Place Library network.  In FPL Children’s Departments we have a special focus on serving young children and their entire family.  I wanted to attend the CATS Winter Workshop specifically because I had seen two programs directly related to my work with Family Place on the roster: the opening session on ACEs, and a program entitled “Grown-Ups Are People Too.”

I enjoyed all the sessions I attended at CATS this year, and I loved getting the giveaways from Baker & Taylor.  (Sidenote: I just finished the ARC they gave out of Lynne Kelly’s Song for A Whale, and loved it!  A super-smart girl who loves science and has taught herself to fix radios learns about a whale who sings at a different frequency than all other whales, with the result that no other whales understand him.  Iris can relate to this, since she is the only Deaf student at her school, so she decides she’s going to create a song for him to help him know someone is listening.  Read it: it’s amazing!)

Opening Session: “Adverse Childhood Experiences: Changing the Narrative” – Kathy Orr

Going into this, I was already familiar with how toxic stress and neglect in infancy and the early childhood years can directly affect a child’s brain and future capacity for learning.  But the research that Kathy Orr presented on how ACEs can have a negative impact on the health of other organs and bodily functions furthered my understanding.  It was certainly disquieting to learn the statistics that 67% of the participants in the ACE study had experienced at least one of the listed adversities as a child, and 87% of those had experienced more than one.  Furthermore, when I looked over the sample questionnaire from the study, I was surprised to see that the trials of being bullied and the death/disappearance of a close family member (like a parent or sibling) were not listed as part of the ACE study.  In my opinion these should also be considered ACEs, which would likely increase the percentage of individuals impacted even further.

Kathy’s presentation of this study revealed that ACEs are much more common than one would expect, but I hope that this knowledge won’t cause us to despair, but to recognize that these challenging histories are experienced by a majority of the people with whom we interact.  Realizing this, we can further our work to have empathetic perspectives, especially with more challenging patrons.  We can think about some of the biggest takeaways that she shared with us:

  • Change the (internal) narrative from “what is wrong with you” to “what has happened to you?”
  • When confronted with big emotions: share our calm, rather than join in the chaos.

Grown-Ups Are People Too – Julie Crabb

I am so glad that the majority of colleagues in our profession have moved away from the idea that we are here to educate/entertain the kids alone.  The work that we do can have greater impact on the life of a child by focusing our efforts to give great early literacy information to parents and caregivers during the course of our regular programming, in the spirit of Every Child Ready to Read. But I have felt much like Julie, in that our programs need to be fun for adults so that they are willing to keep bringing their children.  I’ve always tried to focus on using children’s music that I feel can be enjoyed by adults – artists like Laurie Berkner, Jim Gill, and Emily Arrow produce fun songs that aren’t grating on adult ears.  (At least, I enjoy them – and I’ve gotten good feedback from many caregivers about them too.)  I’ve tried to include pop culture songs as well – “Octopus’ Garden” is a great scarf song, for example.  But I really liked the variety of songs Julie talked about using for Baby Wearing Dance programs.  I felt challenged to shake things up even further, and after CATS I searched for a hip-hop song I could use for one of my regular Music and Movement programs, to tie into the 2019 CLEL Bell shortlist title Hip-Hop Lollipop, by Susan McElroy Montanari.  Trying to find a hip-hop song appropriate to do with 2 and 3 year-olds was challenging, but I ended up using “The Cupid Shuffle” and got many great comments about it! 

Julie shared many great ideas in her program – I’m excited to continue to push my own programming boundaries in order to keep adults interested in bringing their kids to programs.  It’s definitely worth it!

PokeWhat?! Using Augmented Reality to Create Library Programming

By Tana Lucero – Teen Services Librarian | Arvada

Jefferson County Public Library

By now most people are probably somewhat familiar with Pokemon Go, the first smash hit AR (augmented reality) game to really make a sizeable impression on, well, the world.  For the unaware, Pokemon Go is a game released in 2016 by Niantic Corp. in conjunction with Nintendo.   Designed to be used on mobile devices using iOS or Android software, it uses the GPS in the device to help users locate, capture and challenge Pokemon monsters.  The pocket monsters seem to appear in real world locations relative to the user’s device.  Hey!  Is that a Pokemon in my living room?  Yup!  I’m gonna hurl a pineapple at it!

Short of creating your own worldwide gaming phenomenon, what can the average librarian do with augmented reality?  Well, even without advanced tech skills, there are some pretty fun things you can do!  Here are two programs I’ve created for my teens in the last few years that will give you just a hint of what you can do…

Fantastical Beast Hunts:

My first attempt at creating an augmented reality program was made in conjunction with the release of Fantastic Beasts in 2016.  It was a simple scavenger hunt I built using an app that was called Aurasma at the time.  Aurasma has since been purchased by Hewlett Packard and is now called HP Reveal

I built the scavenger hunt on my desktop, collecting the images I wanted to use in the hunt itself.  First, I collected Harry Potter wallpaper background imagery to use on my ‘badges’ that I was going to hide throughout the library.  The badges were round, about 2.5” across, and printed on card stock.  Each badge had a distinctly different image printed on it.  I created these using Publisher.

I also collected fantastic beast images (look away copyright wonks!) which were sometimes from the books or were just pictures of creatures I came across in image searches.  In general, just weird stuff – big foot, dragons, puppy unicorns, whatever.  I also tried to include funny stuff, like a sentient tofurky picture, for example. I took these images and added a name to the images using Photoshop.  So the tofurky, for example, now had the name “Toni” attached to it. 

Using the Aurasma app, I would upload a badge image and then I would attach a fantastic beast image to that badge and give it a unique name.  Once it was saved into the system, it became retrievable by anyone who is following that feed using the Aurasma app. 

The scavenger hunt was pretty simple.  Teens downloaded the free Aurasma app into their smartphones or if they didn’t have a suitable device, we loaned them a tablet.  Once they were logged into the app, they would find and follow us on the app. We gave them a printed scorecard that had pictures of the badges they had to find.  The pictures had to be tiny and somewhat out of focus so that the teens wouldn’t just scan the scorecard to find the beasts.  (Teens… they can easily outsmart grownups, so we had to be crafty!)

Giving them a timed start, the teens headed out into the library looking for badges which they would scan with their smart device.  In a second or so the fantastic beast would appear on their screen layered on top of the badge, and the teen could then write down the name of the beast on their scorecard.  The team that filled out their scorecard first with all the correct names got a prize.  (In all likelihood, something odd… like a pop tart or beef jerky. Sorry, teens.)

Ready, Player One?!

My second augmented reality program was to celebrate the release of Ready Player One.  This is a favorite book, so the clues I used were mostly 80’s trivia that came from the book.  This program required more of a storyline, since one clue would lead into the next clue and so on. 

I built the game in much the same way that the book does – there is the initial challenge:  find the three keys to unlock the gates.  This first clue was printed on a card that was handed to the teens.  They scanned the card, got the first of their augmented clues, and away they went! 

Because we were in the library, I took advantage of the Dewey decimal system, used actual books and DVD cases as scan clues, and made use of the different spaces in the library.  If a clue sent the teens to the children’s nonfiction section, there was a poster nearby that—scanned– would be their next clue.  One of the clues included a math problem, which solved, led to a particular item with corresponding Dewey number.  Sometimes the found item would have a “scan me” note that would then reveal the next clue and sometimes the item had a written clue that could then be followed to the next item. 

There was a black light clue, an origami challenge, Monty Python and Indiana Jones movie clip clues, hidden messages in YouTube comment sections and lots of “cool” 80’s references… many of which meant NOTHING to the Gen Z teens!  Luckily, each clue I created was designed to be googled if necessary, so the teens would never be completely stumped.  Since they were using smart devices, I figured they should be able to use the tools needed to find the answer. 

Attaching the digital information to the actual item worked the same way as in the scavenger hunt.  I would select the image of a particular DVD, for example, upload it into HP Reveal and then attach the clue to it.  The clues I created using Publisher were basically cards with written clues on them.  When the teen would scan the DVD cover, a card with a clue written on it would slowly appear over the DVD case.  There is a way to screenshot those images within the app, so if they wanted to keep them for reference they could.

Since the trivia for this program was sometimes well beyond the cultural knowledge of the teens, I did have an adult standing by to assist if they got stuck. Overall, this program was attractive to the older teens that attended that particular event.  (My younger teens got caught up playing the Ollie skee-ball game we created, along with the board games we had out.)  A more complicated program like this would work well for adults, too. 

In the future we might see publishers producing digital overlays for us to attach to our library environments – wouldn’t it be fun to see a dinosaur in the children’s area on our smart phone?  Or Pete the Cat?  But in the meantime, don’t be intimidated to try your hand at creating your own augmented reality programs.  They can be as simple or complex as you want — Fun, silly and educational.  Now if you’ll excuse me… Toni, the tofurky, needs a pineapple…

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions!

tana.lucero@jeffcolibrary.org

HP Reveal            https://www.hpreveal.com/

CATS 2019 Winter Workshop Reflection: Brigitta Lockman

I’m a fairly new Program and Outreach Coordinator with the Pueblo City-County Library district, so when I saw that the CATS Winter Workshop was going to host two different sessions discussing story time, the program I needed the most help learning about and improving, I was excited to attend and learn more.

The first session, Rock and Roll your Way to Cooler Storytimes, taught me a lot about all of the different ways you can incorporate music and rhythm into story time and just how important they really are. I had no clue about rhythm sticks before that session, so when I returned to work I ordered a set to try out with my program’s kiddos. I have also worked a call and response song into next week’s story time, and plan to focus more on tapping out rhythm and using recorded music, both things that would work wonders with my restless toddler group.

The second presentation, Sensory Storytime for Children, Teens & Adults: Tips and Tricks was very interesting. I did not previously know about story times focused on the sensory-sensitive, and have talked about the possibility of hosting a similar program at our branch. I’m gathering the supplies needed to create a diverse group of sensory bins that can be used throughout the year during story time, and am researching how I can make our current story times more friendly to those who might be sensitive.

Overall, I’m very thankful that I was able to attend the CATS Winter Workshop. I learned so many new things, and hope to carry all of my knowledge into my programs in order to keep improving them for our amazing community.

CATS 2019 Winter Workshop Reflection: Drew Kenyon

I drove down from Westminster to Library 21C in Colorado Springs with a few of my colleagues.  Unsure of the commute and traffic, we left super early.  So early, we ended up in the parking lot of the library with a gorgeous view of Pikes Peak and ample time to get to know one another better.  We had a presenter amongst us so we were also privy to a preview/practice run through of her session! Thanks Leigh!

The opening main presenter was probably my top pick- mainly because of the library branch I serve in has many parallels to her topic.  Titled “Adverse Childhood Experiences: changing the narrative” presenter Kathy Orr spoke about how childhood experiences affect the stories of our lives down the road.  Although majority of her talk was difficult to hear, it was simultaneously an encouragement to library staff that our work is vital and we are making a difference to so many, especially to those in difficult situations or from difficult backgrounds.  The presenter had participants fill out a questionnaire to really get an idea of all the life experiences, whether in our control or not, that have an impact on our mental health.  These are strongly connected to brain health and therefore to our literacy development and growth.  Orr’s session was full of sobering research, making me thankful for my family and upbringing, as well as motivating me to look for opportunities to help patrons.  We may never know the impact we have individually with a patron or how our programs impact patrons in our community.  Someone during the day mentioned librarians being social workers too!  How true – We all know through our love of books how a story can have an impact on our lives, but our personal connection to our patrons can help as well.

Throughout the day there were a great variety of sessions to choose from, a wonderful lunch hour to connect with people and a chance to make new friends, and a visit from Baker & Taylor reps highlighting what is new.  Loved the bound Bob books!

My head was full at the end of the day.  Every session had a take away to apply to our programs, new ideas to try, old things to resurrect, new audiences to reach out to.  If you were unable to attend or even if you did and you want a refresher on the day, click on the handouts tab of the CATS website to locate this year’s resources.  Thanks to all the presenters and organizers for their courage and wealth of knowledge!  Your time and input are invaluable.

Drew Kenyon

Library Associate

Westminster Public Library

CATS 2019 Winter Workshop Reflection: Kimberly Sewell

As a library employee and a lover of books, there is always a thrill of excitement walking into a new library for the first time. Heading into Library 21C for the CATS Winter Workshop was no exception. Outside, the building cut an impressive figure against the beautiful backdrop of the Rocky Mountains, and the quiet shufflings of the early morning patrons just starting to file in at opening had a serene quality. You would never guess there were dozens of library employees upstairs, gathering from all over the state, warming up their voices and rubbing the sleep out of their arms and legs, getting ready to launch into a chorus of storytime songs and silly dances.

The opening session, “Adverse Childhood Experiences: Changing the Narrative,” however, was anything but silly. Presenter Kathy Orr discussed the effects of early childhood experiences and trauma on the brain. It was a sobering start to the day, but an important reminder that the work we do everyday is so much more impactful than just sharing brightly colored books and simple crafts. By engaging with youth and creating a space for them to bond with their caregivers, libraries offer a space for children and adults to make meaningful connections that can set them up for successful relationships that support healthy brain growth and prevent future trauma and lifestyle choices that can have lasting impacts on their health well into adulthood. Orr’s talk was jam-packed with well-researched information and felt like a call to arms for library staff to recommit ourselves to making our programs a place for those connections to happen, a place for families to learn how to grow together.

From there, the sessions got more lighthearted, though no less powerful. Presenters offered great resources for how to reach specific demographics and cater to their varied needs. In “Sensory Storytime for Children, Teens and Adults,” the presenters shared some of the ways in which they create a safe space for their patrons with autism and sensory sensitivities. Tactics as simple as creating a predictable schedule and sticking to it can make all the difference in a program like this! In “Grown Ups are People Too,” Julie Crabb reminded us that babies can’t get to storytime all by themselves and that it is important to remember that parents need to feel engaged as well to keep coming back. Again, it was simple tips and tricks like adding pop culture references or spicing up your storytime playlist with a few modern songs that were suggested. So much of the advice shared during all of the sessions followed this same theme: simple, budget-friendly, anyone can do it! After every session groups of library staff could be seen sitting and discussing how easy it would be to start implementing this idea or that at their library or in their storytime next week!

Between sessions and during lunch (which was delicious) we had an opportunity to explore the library. What a treat! Aside from the enviable view of the mountains, the library boasted an incredible display of artwork. There were beautifully decorated display tables set up for Valentine’s Day and Black History Month in the main area and children’s area alike. Glass cases displayed artwork as a way of advertising craft offerings at the branch, such a beautiful way to showcase library programming!

Not only were the sessions full of great information, but we were treated to a preview of the spring collection from Baker & Taylor and spoiled with a selection of awesome freebies! As if our TBR lists weren’t long enough, the reps from Baker & Taylor shared some must read upcoming titles to be on the lookout for and even sent us home with copies of a few of their favorites that were on the horizon. It might be a little silly to say it was my favorite part of the day, but I mean, come on…free books? AND their mascots are cats! How perfect is that!? To be purrfectly honest, I had been waiting all day from some mention of cats…there was a distinct lack of cat-themed puns, and this session more than made up for that.

The final break out session was a close competitor for my favorite part of the day. My own work in my library district is as a Program and Outreach Coordinator for the Lamb Branch for the Pueblo City-County Library District. As such, I oversee programming for all ages. In particular, my goal for this year is to build our offerings for teens, who are currently underserved at our branch. During the last session of the day, we were given the opportunity to split into two groups, discussing programming ideas for either children or teens. This proved to be an awesome opportunity to pick the brains of all the other attendees and see what they are doing around the state to serve teens. Everyone shared at least one program they currently run or have run in the past to serve teens, what size group they served, what kind of budget and set up it took to run and how it went. Hands were flying over notepads (led by our brand-new cat shaped Baker and Taylor pens…seriously these were the best giveaways) as we all took down the ideas generously offered up. It was so nice to hear from more experienced programmers talking about how they organize programs for teens, and also reassuring to know that what I had accomplished so far in growing my teen offerings was moving me in the right direction.

I left Library 21C that Monday afternoon, with a Justin Timberlake song stuck in my head (accompanied by a series of simple dance steps for moms and babies), and a whole bunch of new tools in my toolbox, ready to try things out at my branch! This month I’m dusting off our bubble maker for storytime. Our district is already working on a mommy and baby dance class, and I’m coming up with a list of guests to bring to storytime. I have a list of crafts and programs to try with my teens in the upcoming months and a new appreciation for how important these fun programs and projects can be for all of the young people in our community. I enjoyed the CATS Winter Workshop so much and I can’t wait for the next one!

  • Kimberly Sewell
    •   Program and Outreach Coordinator, PCCLD

 

A fun visual schedule for Sensory Storytime so patrons know what to expect and when during their visit! This can help manage expectations and assist patrons who may have sensitivities know when a particular activity is coming up that they would enjoy or rather avoid.

Adapting pop music so it’s baby friendly is one way presenters suggested making storytime more engaging for grown ups! This is a silly rendition of “Rapper’s Delight” that presenter Julie Crabb created and shared with us.

One of the awesome art installations on display at Library 21C just outside our conference room. So cool!

Can’t stop the feelin’! Conference-goers dancing to Justin Timberlake in a tutorial of a mommy and baby dance class program model. (Yes, I danced too as soon as I finished taking this photo). We had a lot of fun!

CATS Winter Workshop Registration Will Be Closing Wednesday January 30th…Don’t Miss Out! 

Register here: https://cal-webs.org/meetinginfo.php?id=28 

When: Monday February 4th from 9-4 

Where: Library 21c Colorado Springs 

Registration fee: $45 for CAL members, $55 for Non-CAL Members 

What to look forward to: 

9:00 Library Doors Open 

9:10 Welcome and Introductions 

9:15-10:00 Opening Session – The Venue
Adverse Childhood Experiences: Changing the Narrative Kathy Orr, Peaceful Households 

This educational session is designed to explore how childhood experiences affect our health and social well-being. You will learn from an experienced ACE Master Trainer about the ACE study and the relationship between ACEs and an individual’s failure in school, inability to manage behaviors, homeless, poverty, incarceration, chronic disease including addiction, cardiovascular, liver and respiratory diseases. Furthermore, you will learn how ACEs can help you better understand social determinants and apply them to your professional and personal life. 

10:15-11:00 Breakout Session One (choose one):
1. Venue – Rock and Roll Your Way to Cooler Storytimes
2. ENT Meeting Room – Hooking Transitional Readers (Part 1)
3. Children’s Activity Room – The Hidden Biases of Good People 

11:15-12:00 Breakout Session Two (choose one):
1. Venue – Sensory Storytime for Children, Teens & Adults: Tips & Tricks
2. ENT Meeting Room – Hooking Transitional Readers (Part 2)
3. Children’s Activity Room – Getting Your Lock-In All Locked Up 

12:00-1:15 Lunch – The Venue 

1:15-2:00 Baker and Taylor – The Venue 

2:15-3:00 Breakout Session Three (choose one):
1. Venue – Grown-Ups Are People Too
2. ENT Meeting Room – Below the Surface
3. Children’s Activity Room – Serving Your Deaf and/or Blind Patrons 

3:15-4:00 Program Idea Sessions 

Questions? Contact the CATS Chair Maria Kramer at maria.kramer@pueblolibrary.org<mailto:maria.kramer@pueblolibrary.org

CATS Winter Workshop is Just Under Two Weeks Away…Have You Registered? 

Register here: https://cal-webs.org/meetinginfo.php?id=28 

When: Monday February 4th from 9-4 

Where: Library 21c Colorado Springs 

Registration fee: $45 for CAL members, $55 for Non-CAL Members 

What to look forward to: 

9:00 Library Doors Open 

9:10 Welcome and Introductions 

9:15-10:00 Opening Session – The Venue
Adverse Childhood Experiences: Changing the Narrative Kathy Orr, Peaceful Households 

This educational session is designed to explore how childhood experiences affect our health and social well-being. You will learn from an experienced ACE Master Trainer about the ACE study and the relationship between ACEs and an individual’s failure in school, inability to manage behaviors, homeless, poverty, incarceration, chronic disease including addiction, cardiovascular, liver and respiratory diseases. Furthermore, you will learn how ACEs can help you better understand social determinants and apply them to your professional and personal life. 

10:15-11:00 Breakout Session One (choose one):
1. Venue – Rock and Roll Your Way to Cooler Storytimes
2. ENT Meeting Room – Hooking Transitional Readers (Part 1)
3. Children’s Activity Room – The Hidden Biases of Good People 

11:15-12:00 Breakout Session Two (choose one):
1. Venue – Sensory Storytime for Children, Teens & Adults: Tips & Tricks
2. ENT Meeting Room – Hooking Transitional Readers (Part 2)
3. Children’s Activity Room – Getting Your Lock-In All Locked Up 

12:00-1:15 Lunch – The Venue 

1:15-2:00 Baker and Taylor – The Venue 

2:15-3:00 Breakout Session Three (choose one):
1. Venue – Grown-Ups Are People Too
2. ENT Meeting Room – Below the Surface
3. Children’s Activity Room – Serving Your Deaf and/or Blind Patrons 

3:15-4:00 Program Idea Sessions 

Questions? Contact the CATS Chair Maria Kramer at maria.kramer@pueblolibrary.org

Registration for CATS Winter Workshop Now Open!

Register here: https://cal-webs.org/meetinginfo.php?id=28

We have 6 scholarships available to cover the cost of the workshop. Please fill out the application by January 11th here: https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4759615/2019-CATS-Winter-Workshop-Scholarship-Application

When: Monday February 4th from 9-4

Where: Library 21c Colorado Springs

Registration fee: $45 for CAL members, $55 for Non CAL Members

What to look forward to:

9:00 Library Doors Open

9:10 Welcome and Introductions

9:15-10:00 Opening Session – The Venue

Adverse Childhood Experiences: Changing the Narrative Kathy Orr, Peaceful Households

This educational session is designed to explore how childhood experiences affect our health and social well-being. You will learn from an experienced ACE Master Trainer about the ACE study and the relationship between ACEs and an individual’s failure in school, inability to manage behaviors, homeless, poverty, incarceration, chronic disease including addiction, cardiovascular, liver and respiratory diseases. Furthermore, you will learn how ACEs can help you better understand social determinants and apply them to your professional and personal life.

10:15-11:00 Breakout Session One (choose one):

  1. Venue – Rock and Roll Your Way to Cooler Storytimes
  2. ENT Meeting Room – Hooking Transitional Readers (Part 1)
  3. Children’s Activity Room – The Hidden Biases of Good People

11:15-12:00 Breakout Session Two (choose one):

  1. Venue – Sensory Storytime for Children, Teens & Adults: Tips & Tricks
  2. ENT Meeting Room – Hooking Transitional Readers (Part 2)
  3. Children’s Activity Room – Getting Your Lock-In All Locked Up

12:00-1:15 Lunch – The Venue

1:15-2:00 Baker and Taylor – The Venue

2:15-3:00 Breakout Session Three (choose one):

  1. Venue – Grown-Ups Are People Too
  2. ENT Meeting Room – Below the Surface
  3. Children’s Activity Room – Serving Your Deaf and/or Blind Patrons

3:15-4:00 Program Idea Sessions

Questions? Contact the CATS Chair Maria Kramer at maria.kramer@pueblolibrary.org<mailto:maria.kramer@pueblolibrary.org>

Scholarship Deadline Fast Approaching for Winter Workshop

We have 6 scholarships available to cover the cost of the workshop. Please fill out the application by January 11th here: https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4759615/2019-CATS-Winter-Workshop-Scholarship-Application

Registration will open soon so save the date! We will share the link out when it goes live.

In the meantime…put the following information on your calendars, you won’t want to miss it!

When: Monday February 4th from 9-4

Where: Library 21c Colorado Springs

Registration fee: $45 for CAL members, $55 for Non CAL Members

What to look forward to:
9:00 Library Doors Open

9:10 Welcome and Introductions

9:15-10:00 Opening Session – The Venue
Adverse Childhood Experiences: Changing the Narrative
Kathy Orr, Peaceful Households

This educational session is designed to explore how childhood experiences affect our health and social well-being. You will learn from an experienced ACE Master Trainer about the ACE study and the relationship between ACEs and an individual’s failure in school, inability to manage behaviors, homeless, poverty, incarceration, chronic disease including addiction, cardiovascular, liver and respiratory diseases. Furthermore, you will learn how ACEs can help you better understand social determinants and apply them to your professional and personal life.

10:15-11:00 Breakout Session One (choose one):
1. Venue – Rock and Roll Your Way to Cooler Storytimes
2. ENT Meeting Room – Hooking Transitional Readers (Part 1)
3. Children’s Activity Room – The Hidden Biases of Good People

11:15-12:00 Breakout Session Two (choose one):
1. Venue – Sensory Storytime for Children, Teens & Adults: Tips & Tricks
2. ENT Meeting Room – Hooking Transitional Readers (Part 2)
3. Children’s Activity Room – Getting Your Lock-In All Locked Up

12:00-1:15 Lunch – The Venue

1:15-2:00 Baker and Taylor – The Venue

2:15-3:00 Breakout Session Three (choose one):
1. Venue – Grown-Ups Are People Too
2. ENT Meeting Room – Below the Surface
3. Children’s Activity Room – Serving Your Deaf and/or Blind Patrons

3:15-4:00 Program Idea Sessions

Questions? Contact the CATS Chair Maria Kramer at maria.kramer@pueblolibrary.org